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Brian Motroni is a personal injury attorney in Tampa working as a partner for Hunter Law P.A. He started his career 12 years ago when he received a Juris Doctorate Degree from the Stetson University College of Law. His first introduction to the field of law, however, took place while he worked as a law clerk during his undergraduate studies in political science. Getting some exposure to the legal field so early cemented his decision to become an attorney. Now, he is a leader for Tampa’s personal injury cases as he has successfully negotiated hundreds of settlements for his local clients.

What is the hardest case that you ever worked on?

Labeling a case as “hard” is a little bit difficult and can be misleading. Some cases are hard simply because the injuries are so horrific and it is hard seeing my clients and their family suffer. Other cases are hard because the insurance company is acting unreasonably and making things more difficult than they should be. Then there are those cases that are hard because the facts of the case are unique or the law isn’t very clear or well-defined. The longest running case I have been apart of dates back to 2007. The case is finally set for trial in October 2018. That case is a combination of the three types of “hard” cases that I deal with; bad injuries, uncooperative insurance company, and uncertainty with the law.

Do you believe that every law is open to interpretation?

Ideally, there shouldn’t be the need for interpretation. It is crucial for citizens to know exactly what their legal obligations and duties are in order for them to be able to abide by the law. However, the reality is that laws are written by fallible people and require specific and unique language. We are then left to try and figure out exactly what was meant when the law was drafted or how it applies to a specific set of circumstances. This can prove particularly difficult as time goes on and society and technology changes.

Have you ever considered pursuing a position as a judge?

Not at this point in my career. I still enjoy the practice of law and the process leading up to a trial and verdict. I particularly enjoy the challenge of convincing someone that my side of the story is right. If I were to become a judge, I would be on the other side of court cases where there are a lot more administrative work and no actual client interaction. Maybe at some point in my career, that will seem more appealing to me, but I still have a lot of fight left in me and great clients that need my help.

How does Hunter Law P.A. get new clients?

Surprisingly, most of our clients come to us through referrals from former clients, and, quite frankly, that is the most flattering way to obtain a client. To have someone trust you enough to send a friend or loved one to you speaks to the quality of work that you do as a lawyer. Our website also helps to generate a lot of business. We like to offer legal resources and blog entries to keep our clients and the public-at-large updated on the latest developments and changes in the law.

Have you ever seen yourself doing anything other than legal work?

I initially went to school to get a bachelor’s degree in political science. There was a period in my life where being a politician was appealing to me. My younger, less experienced self-didn’t see the political process as a struggle for money and power, but rather as an opportunity to make our communities a better place. As I matured, I saw the dirty underbelly of the political process and decided that life was not for me.  In retrospect, I am glad that I changed my mind as my career has turned out to be everything that I ever wanted.

How hard is it to get Bar certification?

It depends on a lot of factors. For those who are not exactly dying to become lawyers, every single law class will be like a sequel to the movie “Mission Impossible.” If one does want to practice law but does not do well with written tests, the same scenario will take place. So, it depends on how versatile someone’s test-taking skills are and how passionate they are about this career. A shortcoming in either one of those two areas can make the Bar exam extremely difficult to pass. After all, it is ranked as one of the hardest professional exams in the entire world.

Would you consider yourself a fierce recruiter of future lawyers?

Yes and no. I am a fierce recruiter when it comes to people who are already in law school and plan to practice law one day. Our industry has high turnover rates, and we always look for new employees. Early-stage networking and recruiting can be very fruitful. But if I am interacting with a person that has not decided what their career will be, I do not try to persuade them to do law. The best lawyers have a passion for the profession and view the practice of law as a calling.

About The Author

Adrian Rubin

Adrian Rubin is a freelancer, creative arts director for various marketing and advertising companies in the New York area. Adrian Rubin specializes in making memorable campaigns. You can learn more about his services here: AdrianRubin.net