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Andrew Charlton is one of the world’s leading economists and financial experts who have developed his career from being a Rhodes scholar at Oxford University to become a respected political advisor for the Australian Government and well-known author. The work of Charlton began with his attendance at the prestigious, internationally-acclaimed Oxford University where he earned both a master’s degree and doctorate while studying as a Rhodes scholar.

As a respected economics advisor and researcher, Andrew Charlton has written a number of articles and books including his “Fair Trade For All” publication which was written alongside the Nobel Prize-winning financial expert Joseph Stiglitz. The rise of Charlton has been fast and has seen him accept a range of positions within the Australian Government including the position of Senior Economic Advisor to the Prime Minister of Australia. Over the course of his career, Charlton has also developed his status as an entrepreneur with a bright future. He was named as a Global Young Leader of 2011 at the World Economic Forum. Now the leader of AlphaBeta Advisors, a financial research company working with global giants such as Google to examine the development of automation in Australia and its effects on employment and workers rights.

How did you get started with AlphaBeta Advisors?

As a student, I was passionate about the development of a keen discussion about the future of the financial industry and how technology will affect the world. One of the most challenging aspects of working in economics and finance is getting hold of reliable, independent research completed with as little bias as possible. Creating AlphaBeta Advisors was a definite attempt to make sure the economic problems of the past are not repeated with the same shock and surprise for consumers as was seen during the 2008 financial crash.

What exactly does your company do?

That’s a tough question to ask as we are a specialized research company seeking to create a better understanding of the economic situation in various parts of the world. For example, we have recently been conducting a major study into the role of automation in the Australian economy for Google which we used to prove there may well be short-term issues associated with automation but the long-term benefits should outweigh these issues.

Do you only work with multinational clients?

No. We work with businesses of all sizes and can create custom solutions for individual clients who are looking to learn as much as possible about specific aspects of the financial markets. As we own a significant amount of data on different aspects of the markets we can quickly find solutions to problems and answer some of the most complex questions on the future economic state of the world or a specific region. The technology we have developed allows AlphaBeta to learn about different markets in a fast and efficient manner which suits the needs of our clients who are usually looking for answers delivered as quickly as possible.

Was it difficult to establish your business?

AlphaBeta Advisors was born from a relationship I had with my co-founders who have continued to play an essential role in the development of the company as we have grown in stature and respect around the world. As far as getting the first clients we had the benefit of being known in financial circles as we had all worked in high-profile positions and had the advantage of already having good relationships with some prestigious clients around the world which got us, clients, almost as soon as we announced we were starting the company.

Who inspires you as a business leader?

I trained as an economist and believe we can learn a lot from the history of financial regulation and business. One of those who has inspired me is the British economist Ronald Coase who was one of the leading figures in the development of modern financial theory and has recently been rediscovered after falling out of fashion for some years. Regarding modern financial specialists, Mark Carney is a name which stands out as he has done almost everything from the role of investment specialist to leading the Bank of England since 2013.

Do you have any advice for our readers?

I’m a research guy who likes to know exactly what I feel I can discover about business or investment before making a move in the financial markets. I would always tell anybody interested in this business to invest in doing their homework before leaping into any possible deals or creating a company without a complete understanding of where the industry stands.